Creating a wildlife haven one plant at a time

Monday, April 15, 2013

GBBD: April 2013

Spring was slow getting started this year. It started out with temperatures colder than most of our winter. So when spring finally arrived she busted out the blooms. Temperatures in the low 80's along with warm spring showers created the perfect conditions for the beginning of the blooms fest.


The woods are spotted with blooming dogwoods. I love seeing these understory trees blooming in the filtered sunlight. Dogwoods are one of my all time favorite trees.


Another great woodland plant are the azaleas which are native to the Southeast. There are about 13 natives species while several species have been hybridized. In addition to several Piedmont and Florida Flame azaleas I have a few hybrid species from the Confederate series including  'Admiral Semmes', 'Robert E. Lee' and 'J.E.B. Stuart'.

Confederate series: Admiral Semmes
Confederate series: Robert E. Lee

The trillium continue to bloom and are gems on the woodland floor.


A sweet scent lingers through the woodland garden from the sweet shrub. It smells very much like pineapple with a hint of spice. It makes you just want to stop and inhale the fruity air.


Fothergilla 'Mt. Airy' is a hybrid discovered by Michael Dirr, a legend in the horticulture world. This is a fabulous addition to any garden. The blooms have a sweet, honey smell and look great planted amongst azaleas.



At the edge of the woodland garden are many native columbine servicing the ruby-throated hummingbirds that arrived earlier this month.


Another hummingbird favorite is the coral honeysuckle which has been blooming since February.


Carolina Jasmine which starts blooming in very early spring provides a gorgeous pop of color. All that yellow just makes me happy!


The creeping phlox provides a lush carpet on the slope at the edge of the azalea garden.


It is a butterfly favorite in early spring.


The newest addition to our garden is a sign that my husband made for me. Isn't he the sweetest! It still needs to be painted. We are debating on color. Your thoughts and suggestions?


Thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens for hosting this wonderful event each month.

39 comments:

  1. Such lovely spring blossoms. I do envy you that dogwood. Is there a prettier spring-flowering tree?

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    1. It is one of the best. Another great one is Redbud!

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  2. Wow, the flowers are all lovely, made more beautiful by your composition and awesome shots. I love that trilium, haven't seen it yet in person though.

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    1. Thanks Andrea! Georgia has 21 native trillium that grow here. They are pretty remarkable!

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  3. All beautiful pictures. We won't have dogwoods for another few weeks and some of your plants aren't hardy here but I enjoyed your sneak preview of what is to come here in upstate New York if spring makes up its mind and finally stays.

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    1. I hope spring will find you soon! It will be all the more sweet when it arrives!

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  4. Great sign! It looks great as the banner for your blog, too. Your photos and blooms are lovely, Karin! The Phlox looks wonderful draping down the slope. Happy GBBD!

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    1. Awww, thanks! I am really thrilled with the sign. I planted some coral honeysuckle to grown around it for the hummers so they can enjoy it as much as I do!

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  5. Gorgeous pictures - those native plants are simply gorgeous, aren't they? The sign looks great, but I'm not one for color so I can't suggest anything.

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    1. Indeed Ellen! By the way, I will be coming to the GNPS plant sale Saturday. I hope you are there so we can meet.

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  6. Very pretty. Love the Fothergilla. Have been trying to figure out where I could put one myself. Your new sign is great.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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    1. I hope you find a good spot! They really are great in spring and fall.

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  7. The creeping phlox is amazing. The sign is amazing too - what a great addition to the garden. I like the natural wood colour. Happy BBD!

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    1. I can see the phlox right out the kitchen windows. They wake me up each morning. Well, that and my cup of coffee. :)

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  8. Everything is so beautiful :)

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    1. Thanks Felicia! Glad you stopped by for a little tour.

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  9. You have a lot of lovely as well as fragrant blooms! The azaleas are so pretty.

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    1. Native azaleas should be used more often in southern gardens in my opinion. They really are stunning!

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  10. Your spring blooms are wonderful! Love the pictures of the flowering dogwood, creeping phlox, and Carolina jasmine.

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    1. Spring is definitely when the woodland garden shines. Our recent rains have knocked many of the blooms down but there is more to come.

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  11. So pretty in your Georgia garden. I think there is no better place than the south in Springtime! Your husband did a great job on your sign too.

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    1. Thanks Donna! I agree, southern gardens really shine this time of year.

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  12. I was just thinking that the butterflies and hummers must be happy and there was that beauty on the phlox. We are far behind but I will continue my patient wait. i adore your blooms and the new sign. He is wonderful.

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    1. Every day I am seeing more butterflies. Spotted a black swallowtail on the fennel. I hope to see caterpillars soon. I keep watching the weather up north and it is amazing the variety of crazy weather y'all are getting! I hope spring arrives for you soon!

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  13. In that garden is like being in the wild of flowers which is amazing. I want to see plenty of that dogwoods. Love the flowers.

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  14. Your blooms are definitely a month or so ahead of mine! Can't wait until the dogwoods are in bloom in the Ozarks. They're one of my favorites also :)

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    1. I look forward to seeing your dogwoods on your blog. It extends the season viewing blooms to be able to see them in other zones!

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  15. Love seeing these colorful signs of spring, Karin. I can almost smell the fragrance. We've been spoiled down here in Florida where seasonal changes are a little harder to detect. Will soon be heading back north where trilliums won't make an appearance for another 3 weeks (should be a good show - I've heard they've had LOTS of April showers).

    btw - wonderful header !

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    1. Thanks Rick! I look forward to the trilliums every spring. They are so diverse. I think you are getting spoiled with that Florida sunshine!

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  16. Gorgeous spring flowers and beautiful photography. I have a thing for trilliums so I must admit I picked that as my favourite, I have quite a few in my London garden, 3 different varieties. I also liked your native azaleas, they look quite different to my azaleas, I didn't actually know there were native American azaleas :-)

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    1. Helene, I think most people are familiar with the evergreen azaleas that are most commonly seen in gardens in the US but the native azaleas grow in woodland areas and have a much more interesting shape and bloom in my opinion. I have both in my garden (the builder planted the evergreens).

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  17. Your images are just beautiful -- the essence of spring!

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  18. I was smitten with those dogwood, how wonderful to have those in your garden. and the native columbine, can't think of a more classic combination in my mind.

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  19. That sign is fabulous! How about a rich mahogany stain instead of paint? It would last longer, too. Your woodland must be gorgeous right now. I love those azaleas and dogwood flowers. My hybrid dogwood won't bloom for another couple of weeks so I'll just enjoy yours. :o)

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    1. I agree. I want to go with a natural stain. There is a coral honeysuckle that will grow up the post and I think a rich natural wood will allow the blooms to pop. The woodland garden is the best in spring. I will be extending my dogwood blooming season when I see yours. That is the beauty of blogging...we get to enjoy blooms in all the zones.

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  20. By my records I have blooms coming two weeks later than previous years. It has been an odd spring to be sure! We do have many of the same plants. Think the buds on Admiral Semmes were eaten on my tiny shrub. Love these native azaleas.

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"Don't wait for someone to bring you flowers. Plant your own garden and decorate your soul"

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